US military chiefs face grilling over sexual assault

From left, Judge Advocate General of the Army Lt. Gen. Dana Chipman; Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno; Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey; and Legal Counsel to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Brig. Gen. Richard Gross, arrive on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013, to testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on pending legislation regarding sexual assaults in the military. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

From left, Judge Advocate General of the Army Lt. Gen. Dana Chipman; Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno; Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey; and Legal Counsel to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Brig. Gen. Richard Gross, arrive on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013, to testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on pending legislation regarding sexual assaults in the military. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON: America’s top military officers told Congress on Tuesday that sexual assault represented a crisis in the armed forces but warned lawmakers against going too far with legislation stripping commanders of power within the military justice system.

The hearing comes after a wave of sexual assault scandals and new Pentagon data showing a steep rise in unwanted sexual contact, from groping to rape, that have deeply embarrassed the military. In an exceptional display, the top uniformed officers of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard, along with the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, all appeared at the Senate Armed Services Committee together to assure Congress they were taking the matter seriously. The top lawyers from each service sat next to them. “We are acting swiftly and deliberately to change a climate that has become too complacent,” said General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The service chiefs made clear that it was important to maintain the power of commanders, who now have the ability to decide which cases go to trial. But under proposed legislation by Democratic Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, responsibility for prosecuting sex crimes would be taken out of the victim’s chain of command altogether and given to special prosecutors. General Raymond Odierno, chief of staff of the Army, said that proposal could hurt unit cohesion and noted the importance of the commander to quickly “administer justice.” 

“Without equivocation, I believe maintaining the central role of the commander in our military justice system is absolutely critical,” Odierno said. Still, many critics of the military’s handling of past cases say the system is broken and radical change is necessary. 

A study the Defence Department released in May estimated that cases of unwanted sexual contact in the military, from groping to rape, rose 37 percent in 2012, to about 26,000 cases from 19,000 the previous year. 
There has been an outcry in Congress over how the military handles such cases, including those in which commanders showed leniency to accused offenders.

Source: Reuters

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